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Which camera and lense are you using?

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  • Which camera and lense are you using?

    I'm not sure if this thread exists already but I couldn't find it. Which ca,era and lense is everyone using. I used to use a cannon rebel xti DSLR but I didn't have a good lense for it. I actually traded it in for a point an shoot. However I do miss the bigger camera sometimes and always wanted a good lense for the camera.
    Which mode do you shoot in?
    Software to alter the photos or what not.
    I'm really a novice at this but I find it so interesting

    Corey

  • #2
    Until recently I was using a Nikon D60. My default general purpose lens is a Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 af-s. I've got a 55-200mm f/4-5.6 too, but don't use it very often. Still, its nice to have on hand when you need it.

    About 2 weeks ago I picked up a D5200 and a 105mm f/2.8 af-s vr to learn macro. Its a really fun toy, but I'm not very good with it yet.

    Shooting mode depends on what I'm photographing. For basic stuff I tend to use Auto because its easy. When trying for tank shots with the D60 & 18-55mm I generally used macro or manual mode. With the D5200 and 105mm I'm mostly relying on Aperture Priority mode so far. It'll be a while before I take off those training wheels... lol

    For editing I use Elements at work and CS6 at home. Both have their advantages and disadvantages. Elements is definitely easier to use on the fly and is more than sufficient for most everyday processing needs.
    Over thinking, over analyzing separates the body from the mind.

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    • #3
      Ha! I was hoping you'd chime in aaron! With my cannon I had the 18-55 lens too but I didn't feel like it got good close up(really close) up pictures. That could be a vanity of things tho. My lack of knowledge or my non use of editing.
      I would like to get another good camera and find a good macro lens. They are $$$ though!
      Corey

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BIECAKA View Post
        With my cannon I had the 18-55 lens too but I didn't feel like it got good close up(really close) up pictures. That could be a vanity of things tho.
        Yeah, 18-55 can get some decent closeups, but not the Super closeups that make coral look awesome. A friend of mine gave me an extension tube he wasn't using anymore- those can take a normal lens and give you some macro abilities for pretty cheap. Its a great cheat if you don't want to spend money on a 1:1 lens. I used the extension a lot.

        Hopefully Hollback and Lincutis see this. I'm willing to bet they've got all kinds of good tips.
        Over thinking, over analyzing separates the body from the mind.

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        • #5
          Yah Jason.........

          Corey

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          • #6
            canon 6d, canon 50d have 24-105mm L4, 50mm 1.8,
            100mm 2.0, 18-200mm, and a few others.
            Lindsey

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            • #7
              Recommendation on a good starter camera?

              Corey

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              • #8
                a good close up macro 75-300. Not top of the line but a good macro. Best thing you can do if your shooting tank pics is to match the white balance and the K of the lights.
                Lindsey

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by BIECAKA View Post
                  I'm not sure if this thread exists already but I couldn't find it. Which ca,era and lense is everyone using. I used to use a cannon rebel xti DSLR but I didn't have a good lense for it. I actually traded it in for a point an shoot. However I do miss the bigger camera sometimes and always wanted a good lense for the camera.
                  Which mode do you shoot in?
                  Software to alter the photos or what not.
                  I'm really a novice at this but I find it so interesting

                  Corey
                  What are you trying to shoot. If I knew that we could give suggestions on those items. Do you want general stuff, tank photos, portrait?
                  Lindsey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was speaking in general for reef tanks. Not just me but all reefers as we all love to show off our critters and corals

                    Corey

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                    • #11
                      So, I'm a Canon guy. I like having a full frame like my 6d. Also like having the 1.6 crop factor of my 50d, a good mid level camera.
                      I am intrigued by the new 70d as a mid-level. I like wide angle lenses 17 to 24 mm, but for a really good macro shot I like the 50mm, 60mm or 100mm. You can also get great shots with most of the zoom lenses. Always put you money into the lens. The camera's now all do most of what you want from the Rebel series up, but getting a good lens will make the difference in the pictures.
                      As far as software, I personally use Photoshop and Lightroom as well as Perfect Photo 7.5
                      1. Good lens
                      2. Learn your camera
                      3. Adjust the white balance to match your lights.
                      4. Use a tripod whenever possible.
                      Do these and you will have very little need of software. Maybe to color balance.
                      My 2 cents. I will probably think of 2-3 cents more, later.
                      Lindsey

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                      • #12
                        Believe it or not, I use a 7 year old Cannon Rebel XT with a standard 18-55 lens!

                        So much of it is knowing how to use the camera, understanding what you are photographing and how post production works.

                        Here are some points:
                        • I only shoot Manual and in RAW format. Understanding apature, ISO, shutter speed, and custom white balance are essential to quality coral photos. You should ONLY ever shoot manual! Everything else will provide a poor starting image due to our high Kelvin color temps.
                        • I don't shoot anything with a macro lens. Since I'm only posting photos online, I'm actually really zoomed out (coral fills about 1/16 of the frame) then crop in for the macro view in Photoshop. That is the beauty of 72dpi. If I was wanting to make large prints, a macro lens would come into play. I actually have extension tubes which is a way to cheat and convert a standard lens into a macro.
                        • In depth understanding of Photoshop is also an essential part of quality photos. I actually wrote scrips for Adobe Photoshop back in 2002 so what I can do in the software is not limited by my skills and understanding. This is very important when shooting RAW.


                        The best thing you can do is hands-on experience and trial and error. Let me know if you have additional questions.
                        Last edited by Hollback; 09-15-2013, 08:43 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hollback View Post
                          Believe it or not, I use a 7 year old Cannon Rebel XT with a standard 18-55 lens!

                          So much of it is knowing how to use the camera, understanding what you are photographing and how post production works.

                          Here are some points:
                          • I only shoot Manual and in RAW format. Understanding apature, ISO, shutter speed, and custom white balance are essential to quality coral photos. You should ONLY ever shoot manual! Everything else will provide a poor starting image due to our high Kelvin color temps.
                          • I don't shoot anything with a macro lens. Since I'm only posting photos online, I'm actually really zoomed out (coral fills about 1/16 of the frame) then crop in for the macro view in Photoshop. That is the beauty of 72dpi. If I was wanting to make large prints, a macro lens would come into play. I actually have extension tubes which is a way to cheat and convert a standard lens into a macro.
                          • In depth understanding of Photoshop is also an essential part of quality photos. I actually wrote scrips for Adobe Photoshop back in 2002 so what I can do in the software is not limited by my skills and understanding. This is very important when shooting RAW.


                          The best thing you can do is hands-on experience and trial and error. Let me know if you have additional questions.
                          I smell a class coming on..LOL
                          Lindsey

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I suggested that to the Board months ago, about getting a meeting just for photo tips, not sure if they investigated or not.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lincutis View Post
                              I smell a class coming on..LOL
                              I'd be happy to help!

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