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  • Plumbing question

    So I've been thinking about my sump room setup, I don't have the luxury of a basement so I'm thinking of building the room in my garage.

    Due to the placement of the garage door rails, it's not really practical for me to put the setup on the wall on the other side of the display tank, so I want to run the drain and the return lines towards the back of my garage, where there is room to close off a smaller area, insulate, ventilate and HVAC it.

    Problem is (and hence question) there is a door in the way along where the drain and return lines would run. The Return line is pretty simple, up and over the door and slight slope down into the tank (also may take care of siphon danger naturally?). But the drain line would essentially create a trap as it goes under the door and up and into the 100g rubbermaid sump that will be on the floor of the garage.

    I have no doubts that gravity will work in terms of keeping enough pressure on the drain line, I just want a second set of eyes to make sure it doesn't seem crazy.

    Essentially, taking all the stuff planned in my other thread: http://corareef.org/forum/showthread.php?t=21847 and moving it to the other side of the door. It's about 20-25' total of horizontal space.

    Here's a sketch of my idea, thoughts?
    BUILDING OUT:
    75g corner acrylic pentagon DT with repurposed AIO chambers for marinepure reactor
    3x 50g acrylic frag tanks
    100g rubbermaid sump

  • #2
    So, I have been thinking about this, and I don't think you are going to have enough weight in the overflow to push the water back uphill into the sump.

    If it was somehow in the bottom of the tank, I bet you'd be fine, but then you'd drain your display tank in a power outage.

    That's my 2 cents, but I could be wrong.

    Comment


    • #3
      It might work but the flow would prolly be restricted from its gph, and prolly wouldnt take much to stop the flow too, i would think!

      Comment


      • #4
        Water always flows to the lowest point. It doesn't require head pressure. The only disadvantage to having the plumbing go from the floor back up to the sump is you can get some detritus settling in there. I ran this same kind of plumbing years ago from an elevated cryptic fuge in one room to my display in another it works fine. I would recommend putting a union at the bottom so you can crack it open and drain out the detritus every few years.

        Comment


        • #5
          Great idea hollback, I'll make sure to include that in my design. Also a slight slope in the horizontal run so that it doesn't settle in the entire length of the bottom pipe.

          Good to see you yesterday, hope you had fun at LEAR!
          BUILDING OUT:
          75g corner acrylic pentagon DT with repurposed AIO chambers for marinepure reactor
          3x 50g acrylic frag tanks
          100g rubbermaid sump

          Comment


          • #6
            @rusty, the height of the 100g rubbermaid sump is around my knees. The overflow would start around my head level. There's an 8" concerte footer + 1" of flooring on the other side of the wall versus the concrete garage floor. It's a difference of around 3-4' together, but I was also under the same impression hollback was in that pressure didn't matter as water was always just going to flow to the lowest point regardless of the plumbing in between.

            My main concern was an air bubble or other stoppage in the drain line that would cause a flood from too much water being sent to the DT, including the ATO in the sump dumping too much extra water in.

            I should note that I was going to use the bean overflow design with three drains (2 wet, 1 dry), with all three 1" drains manifolding into a larger 2-3" drain pipe on the garage side that would head to the sump.

            this overflow design:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWMzmiU3wDY

            Also of note the DT is only a 75g corner pentagon. I was only planning on using a 1" return line since that provides more than enough volume to my 50g cube currently.
            BUILDING OUT:
            75g corner acrylic pentagon DT with repurposed AIO chambers for marinepure reactor
            3x 50g acrylic frag tanks
            100g rubbermaid sump

            Comment


            • #7
              From my knowledge manifolding a bean animal doesn't work well, but I could be wrong
              -Travis-

              Comment


              • #8
                I would be afraid that for some reason something got stuck in your drain the emergency drain would not really be an emergency. You could at least run your emergency by itself.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good points. I was mostly thinking of combining the drains for convenience, but given the design, it should be easy enough to just run all three drains as home runs.

                  Thanks everyone for the advice, hopefully catch you all tomorrow evening.
                  BUILDING OUT:
                  75g corner acrylic pentagon DT with repurposed AIO chambers for marinepure reactor
                  3x 50g acrylic frag tanks
                  100g rubbermaid sump

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You can run everything into one drain using these: http://www.pvcfittingsonline.com/401...ucing-tee.html

                    I would however suggest having a standpipe on the end that goes back up above your display water line to allow for air to escape.

                    Comment

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